Browse Tag: FIRE

FIRE

Dumb Financial Decisions: Buying A Home That Is Too Big

Dumb Financial DecisionsEarlier this year, I wrote about our Smart Financial Decision to pay off our mortgage.

Today I’m once again writing about our home, but this time, we’ll be revisiting a Dumb Financial Decision.

Quite simply, when we bought our home six years ago, we purchased a larger house than we really needed.

And the financial ramifications of that decision continue to negatively impact our personal finances every day. Continue Reading

Great Games to Teach Children About Money and Personal Finance (and Math!)

Personal Finance GamesAs we head into the holiday season, many are looking for gift ideas for the children in their lives.

Today I’m going to share some great games we have played with our children, and in some cases also played while growing up. In my opinion, each of these games help teach important lessons about money and personal finance. In their own way, these games have helped shape the financial decisions – both smart and dumb – I have made, and continue to make, in real life on my path towards financial independence and early retirement.

Plus, each of these games is a lot of fun to play!

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Smart Financial Decisions: Paying Off Our Mortgage

Financial IndependenceA few months before starting Retiring On My Terms, Mrs. ROMT and I made one of the biggest decisions of our financial lives.

We decided to pay off our mortgage.

There appear to be at least two very vocal camps in the personal finance community when it comes to discussions about paying off one’s mortgage and other debt.

The first camp is passionate about eliminating all debt as soon as possible.

The second camp believes almost any debt is ok, as long as you expect to earn a higher rate of return on your investments than you are paying in interest.

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Q3 2017 Financial Scorecard: 75% Of The Way To FIRE!

Financial IndependenceAs we head into autumn, the leaves are changing colors, the baseball playoffs are underway, and football season is heating up as the weather is cooling off.

Which can mean only one thing for the ROMT family: it’s time to report on our financial progress during the third quarter!

Publicly tracking our progress towards financial independence and early retirement has really focused our attention on the topic. I’m pleased with the progress we made over the past three months on our Net Worth, 529 Account Funding, and Passive Income goals. We still have a lot of work ahead of us, but during the third quarter we were heading down our path to FIRE with all cylinders firing!

Without further ado, let’s take a look at our progress as of September 30, 2017:

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Update: Chase Freedom Announces 5% Cash Back Categories For Q4 17

Financial IndependenceEarlier this year, I wrote about our attempt to optimize our credit card usage to maximize potential rewards.

Since we aren’t frequent travelers, I focused on finding a card with attractive cash back features, rather than a card with great perks for world travelers. We signed up for a Chase Freedom Credit Card in the spring, which has been a smart financial decision thus far.

As a reminder, Chase Freedom offers 5% cash back on up to $1,500 in purchases in specific spending categories each quarter, and 1% cash back on everything else. Our Fidelity Rewards card offers 2% cash back on all purchases.

To date, we’ve earned $260 in cash back since getting the Chase Freedom card, including sign up bonuses, but the pace at which we earned rewards from our new card slowed dramatically during the third quarter.

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Dumb Financial Decisions: Selling My Potential Rental Property

Financial IndependenceAlmost twenty years ago, when I was single and in my mid-twenties, I purchased my first home after several years of renting.

It was not fancy.

It was a simple two bedroom townhouse, with a one car garage, and a postage stamp of a backyard.

I got a great deal on the place, as I was able to purchase it as a foreclosure for well under $50,000. I dumped my life savings (outside of my retirement accounts) into the purchase, so I did not have a mortgage, which was a huge benefit as I tried to rebuild my financial safety net.

After living in my townhouse for over four years, I decided to return to school full time to pursue a master’s degree in an effort to change careers.

And then I made a financial decision I thought was prudent at the time.

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The Financial Advantages of Blogging About Personal Finance

Early RetirementIf you’re reading this post expecting to learn how to make unimaginable riches on the Internet, my deepest apologies, but you are in the wrong place.

I have only been blogging for three months.

Retiring On My Terms has not generated one cent of income, while costing hundreds of hours of my time, in addition to expenses for web hosting.

And I still have no clue how to effectively use Pinterest, even though I have heard it can be an incredible social networking tool.

That said, the discipline required to think and write about our finances on a regular basis has already paid great dividends to the ROMT family. I’ll highlight a few of the ways our finances have improved as a result of the time I’ve spent blogging.

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Solar Energy Update: Another Bill Bites The Dust!

Solar PowerThe ROMT family is now over two months into our solar energy adventure, and the results continue to impress as we move down our path towards financial independence!

For the month of August, our electric bill dropped by 95% from last year! This followed a 91% reduction in our electric bill for July!

Part of the improvement in August was driven by the fact we used a lot less power this year compared to last year. It was much cooler in our area this August, so the central air had to work a lot less, and I’m hopeful our recent move to LED lightbulbs throughout the house is also paying early dividends.

All in, we used almost 30% fewer kilowatt hours of electricity this August relative to last August. Continue Reading

Dumb Financial Decisions: Not Taking Care of Myself

Early RetirementI have a confession to make to my readers:

I have horrible eating habits, don’t exercise nearly enough, and do a poor job managing stress.

The result is that right now I’m 20 pounds overweight, lack the energy I had a decade ago, and am likely headed towards significant health problems in the coming years if I don’t do a better job taking care of myself.

People on the path to financial independence and early retirement generally do a good job prioritizing future needs over present wants. Without a lot of planning and discipline around one’s finances, it’s hard to successfully make the journey to financial independence.

But this almost blind focus on the future – I just need to put my head down for the next five years, work hard, spend prudently, and invest well, and then life will be perfect! – can have a detrimental impact on the present.

It certainly has happened to me.

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Geographic Arbitrage: The Least Expensive States for Retirement

Geographic ArbitrageGeographic arbitrage is a popular concept in personal finance.

It involves working or living somewhere where you can earn more or spend less than if you worked or lived someplace else.

For example, someone who works remotely from home might decide to live someplace with a lower cost of living. Or a doctor might choose to work someplace where high demand for his or her specialty results in a larger salary. Or a retiree might move from a high cost of living area like New York City to a less expensive state or country, so the money they earned over their career has more buying power.

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